The Emergence of On-Demand Marketing

McKinsey Quarterly recently published an article by Peter Dahlström and David Edelman titled The coming era of ‘on-demand’ marketing. The basic thrust of the article is that marketing is headed toward being on-demand, which the authors define as “not just always ‘on,’ but also always relevant, responsive to the consumer’s desire for marketing that cuts through the noise with pinpoint delivery.”

Dahlström and Edelman contend that on-demand marketing is being fueled by “the continued, symbiotic evolution of technology and consumer expectations.” On the technology front, the authors cite four critical developments:

  • The growth of mobile connectivity
  • The powerful capabilities of HTML5, which enables the creation of more compelling online experiences
  • The appearance of the “Internet of Things” through the use of near-field communications and similar technologies
  • Advances in the handling of “big data”

The authors argue that customer demands are also rising in four areas, which they label Now, Can I, For me, and Simply.

  • Now—Consumers increasingly expect to be able to interact with brands (and with each other) anywhere at any time.
  • Can I—They want to do more new and useful things as more kinds of information are deployed more effectively in ways that create more value.
  • For me—They increasingly expect that all data stored about them will be used to meet their precise needs and/or to personalize what they experience.
  • Simply—Consumers expect all interactions to be simple.

The McKinsey article paints an intriguing picture of the future of marketing, and I recommend that you take the time to read the entire article. For me, one striking aspect of what Dahlström and Edelman call on-demand marketing is the emphasis on responding effectively to the actions and behaviors of potential buyers. To get a good picture of what responding really means, take a look at the infographic in the McKinsey article about “Diane” and the purchase of an audio headset.

To achieve this level of responsiveness, enterprises will need three distinct technological capabilities. First, they must be able to leverage data to understand what potential customers expect and what kinds of interactions they will value. Second, enterprises must be able to reach potential customers with the right kinds of interactions using whatever interaction channel the potential customers prefer. And third, companies need the ability to refine their customer insights in an iterative fashion as more data becomes available and adapt the interactions they provide on a near real-time basis.

None of this will be easy, but many of the necessary technologies already exist, and the capabilities provided by these technologies are evolving rapidly. The greater challenge may be the need to adopt a new marketing mindset.

This article was published before on blog.adamsoftware.net

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Author:Jan Dejosse

CMO - ADAM Software

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