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How to Deliver Consistent Onmichannel Customer Experiences

I recently read somewhere that you know when a concept or practice or a technology application is new when you can’t find one unanimous way to spell it. For example, not that long ago, we would see EcommerceeCommerce, and e-commerce all used with near-equal frequency.

Today, omnichannel (or omni-channel or omni channel) has become a hot buzzword in business, marketing, and technology circles. The concept first gained attention in the retail sector, as retailers sought to link offline, in-store shopping activities and online shopping. During the past twelve months, many marketing pundits have expanded the concept and now use it to describe an approach to marketing that applies to many types of enterprises.

The term omni derives from the Latin word omnis, which means “all” or “universal.” As used today, omnichannel marketing usually means providing consistent, personalized, and contextually appropriate messages and customer experiences on all relevant communication channels and devices.

Some experts contend that true omnichannel marketing requires companies to capture customer interactions in all channels and then make the interaction data useable by allcommunication channels and platforms on a near real-time basis. For example, when a customer or prospect visits a website, the website needs to be “aware” that the customer/prospect just interacted with the brand on the company’s Facebook page.

The ultimate objective of omnichannel marketing is to tell a continuous story and provide a seamless experience that plays out whenever and wherever a customer interacts with a brand.

Few, if any, companies have achieved this level of omnichannel integration, but ominchannel marketing is clearly becoming an important priority for many enterprises.

 

 

How DAM Can Enable and Support Customer Experience Management

This month, ADAM is offering a series of webinars exploring how digital asset management solutions enable and support major strategic marketing objectives.

On December 5th, ADAM hosted Building blocks to create your Integrated Marketing Solution. In this webinar, Bart Omlo, CEO of HintTech, discussed what is required to build truly integrated marketing solutions. You can view a recording of this webinar here.

On December 19th, ADAM will host How to create consistent omnichannel customer experiences?. This presentation will be given by Bart Theys, Senior Consultant with ADAM partner,Delaware Consulting. You can register for this important webinar here.

On Wednesday of this week (December 11th), ADAM will host The role of Digital Asset Management in Customer Experience Management. This webinar will be in the form of a panel discussion that will feature Gordon Walsh, DAM Practice Lead with Accenture, and Timothy Day, Senior Director, DAM Consultancy Practice Lead with Cognizant.

In this week’s webinar, our panel of experts will address three critical questions.

  • Do you see an evolution/trend in the requirements for DAM projects over the last 5 years?
  • Can you describe the biggest challenges to avoid DAM projects being deployed as stand-alone siloed point solutions, but become a business critical part in corporate marketing processes?
  • How can DAM solutions assure their vital role in tomorrow’s CXM/WCM solutions?

Customer experience management has become one of the hottest topics in business and marketing circles. IBM recently published the highlights of its 2013 global C-suite study, The Customer-activated Enterprise, and this study revealed how much importance C-suite executives place on customers and customer experience management.

  • CEOs said that customers exert a bigger influence on their organization’s business strategy than all stakeholders other than the C-suite itself.
  • No matter what their specific role, every CxO wants to become more involved in managing the customer experience.
  • Among CMOs, designing customer experiences for mobile applications was identified as the top marketing priority.

The Role of DAM in a Marketing Technology System

There has been a significant amount of discussion in recent weeks about the future characteristics of digital asset management software and the future structure of the DAM software industry. In October, CMSWire published several articles discussing whether there is still a need for dedicated, “full-featured” digital asset management solutions, and the October CMSWire DAM Tweet Jam included a discussion of whether DAM is becoming (or should become) more specialized. Last month, Ralph Windsor addressed the topic of DAM specialization in a feature article for DAM News.

As you might expect, there’s no shortage of opinions on these topics.

  • Some industry experts contend that DAM software has become “bloated” with features that most users don’t need.
  • Others say that most DAM solutions are too “generic” and don’t provide the specialized functionality that many users require.

Debates regarding the future of DAM are certainly interesting to those of us who are directly involved in producing DAM software. For obvious reasons, we’re also deeply interested in how the DAM software industry will evolve from a competitive perspective. But these are not the only issues that are important to many current and potential DAM users.

One of the greatest challenges facing marketing leaders in large enterprises is to select and implement a marketing technology system that will enable and support the delivery of exceptional customer experiences. DAM software is a critical component of an enterprise-class marketing technology system, but it is only one piece of the puzzle. Therefore, astute marketing leaders will not evaluate DAM software as an isolated, stand-alone application. Of course, the functionality of the DAM software is important, but the ease with which the DAM software can be integrated with other marketing applications is equally important.

On Thursday, December 5th, ADAM will host a webinar – Building Blocks to create your Integrated Marketing Solution – that will address these important issues. During this webinar, Bart Omlo, CEO of HintTech, will explore how to build an integrated marketing technology system and describe the role that DAM software plays in that system.

You can register for this important webinar here.

 

Is Branded Online Video More Efficient Than TV for Marketing?

 

In an earlier post, I discussed the growing importance of video content in the marketing mix for many large enterprises. Research by numerous firms clearly demonstrates that the use and consumption of video content is exploding. For example, ComScore recently reported that nearly 1.3 billion people worldwide watch an average of 162 online videos each per month. And recent research by Accenture revealed that 25% of consumers watch video content on a PC or laptop every day, and other 22% do so at least 3 times per week.

A new (June 2013) worldwide survey by Be On, the AOL global branded content business, shows that enterprise marketers are becoming more confident about the effectiveness of video content, and, as a result, they are increasing their investments in online video.

The Be On study was based on a survey of more than 770 marketing experts from leading brands, media, and creative agencies in the United Kingdom, Europe, and North America. Survey participants were asked about their experiences of using branded online video when planning online advertising campaigns.

Here are some of the major findings of the Be On study.

  • Although television is still considered to be a key driver of brand awareness, 78% of respondents in Europe and 58% globally said they could achieve greater engagement and scale with online video.
  • Seventy-three percent of respondents said that online video spending had increased over the last 12 months. Respondents also indicated that the majority of the increased spending on video content is coming from budgets previously reserved for TV and display advertising.
  • The key reasons for increasing online video spending in the future are better audience targeting (mentioned by 73% of respondents) and measurement (cited by 67% of respondents).
  • Eighty-four percent of survey respondents believe the Internet is becoming a rich brand medium that provides engaging, interactive opportunities to connect with consumers.

The findings of the Be On study demonstrate that enterprise marketers are becoming more reliant on video content to create engagement with prospects and customers. As I indicated in my earlier post, enterprises need an effective and efficient way to manage, localize, and publish videos in order to maximize the potential of video content.

ADAM has recently released ADAM Videos, a new application studio for the ADAM Platform that is specifically designed to meet the rapidly growing needs of corporate video management. ADAM Videos enables enterprises to manage video content with the same flexibility and control that the ADAM Platform provides for other types of digital content assets.

You can learn more about ADAM Videos here.

IBM Survey Identifies Key Attributes of Leading Marketers

 

IBM recently published the findings from its 2013 Global Survey of Marketers. You can view a presentation of the findings here. The 2013 survey included more than 500 marketing professionals worldwide from more than 15 industries.

As you might expect, the top marketing challenges identified by survey respondents were:

  • Acquiring new customers (42%)
    • Retaining existing customers and improving loyalty and satisfaction (35%)
    • Creating consistent, relevant and positive customer experiences across channels (34%)
    • Understanding social media and using social channels effectively (34%)

In analyzing the survey results, IBM identified a group of “Leading Marketers” based on their ownership of the customer experience across channels and their use of marketing technologies. As a group, the Leading Marketers delivered superior financial performance than “all other marketers” on three financial measures.

  • 3-yr Gross Profit Growth – Leading Marketers 1.8x higher
  • 3-yr Net Income Growth – Leading Marketers 3.4x higher
  • 3-yr Stock Price Growth – Leading Marketers 2.4x higher

IBM identified numerous differences between Leading Marketers and all other marketers, and the table below shows just some of the major differences revealed by the survey responses.

BLog Post 78 - Table 1

I would suggest that one of the most important differences between Leading Marketers and other firms is that Leading Marketers take a broader view of marketing responsibilities. For example, the IBM survey asked participants to rate the effectiveness of their marketing organization in performing across all 4P’s of the marketing mix. The table below shows the percentages of Leading Marketers and all other marketers who rated themselves as highly effective across the 4P’s. Notice that the least difference between Leading Marketers and all other marketers is in the area of promotion.

Blog Post 78 - Table 2

In an earlier post, I argued that marketers must focus on all components of the marketing mix if they want to reclaim their strategic role in the C-suite. The results of the IBM survey demonstrate the importance of taking a more holistic view of marketing’s role in the enterprise.

The Changing Role of Content in the Age of the Customer

ADAM recently hosted a webinar titled The Future of Content in An Analytics-Driven World. The webinar was presented by Dave Frankland with Forrester Research. In his presentation, Dave described how new customer behaviors are placing new demands on marketing programs and marketing content and how customer decision management is emerging as an important marketing discipline for most enterprises.

You can view a recording of this important webinar here.

Dave Frankland began his presentation by observing that the source of competitive advantage has evolved significantly since the beginning of the twentieth century. From 1900 to 1960, the primary source of competitive advantage was manufacturing excellence. From 1960 to 1990, the emphasis shifted to excellence in distribution, and from 1990 to 2010, dominating companies excelled at managing information. Since 2010, the companies that have achieved superior competitive results have excelled at delivering exceptional customer experiences.

The challenge is to deliver outstanding customer experiences in a world where a growing number of consumers have virtually constant access to a wealth of online information. For these “always connected” consumers, product research is the new norm. Forrester says that 82% of consumers now research products before they make a purchase, and 54% of consumers rely primarily on digital channels to learn about products and services.

In his presentation, Dave Frankland argued that enterprises need to think in terms of customer decision management rather than in terms of the traditional marketing funnel. Customer decision management is about always being able to “serve up” marketing content that is personally and contextually relevant to individual consumers. Frankland also contends that successful customer decision management will require shifts in marketing strategy, marketing processes, and technology infrastructure.

The Future of Content in an Analytics-Driven World provides many valuable insights for enterprise marketers.

Watch the on-demand version of the webinar here.

Using Video to Amplify Your Content Marketing

Last month, ADAM hosted a webinar that explored how enterprises can use video content to amplify the impact of their content marketing. The webinar was presented by Shiri Friedman, Director of Marketing at Brightcove. Brightcove provides one of the leading platforms for hosting and publishing online video content, and ADAM’s new video management studio ( ADAM Videos ) is designed to work seamlessly with the Brightcove platform.

This was one of our most popular webinars, and you can view a recording of the webinar here.

During the webinar, Shiri Friedman shared several statistics that demonstrate the growing importance of video in the enterprise marketing mix.

  • Web pages with videos attract 2x to 3x more visitors than pages without videos, and they generate a 157% increase in organic traffic from search engines.
  • Website visitors who view a video are 85% more likely to buy than those who do not.
  • 76% of marketers plan to add videos to their websites (which makes video additions a higher priority than Facebook, Twitter, or blog integration).
  • Overall online video consumption is growing at 30%, but video consumption on tablets is growing at 360%, and video consumption on smartphones is growing at 300%.

These statistics are impressive, and they echo other data regarding the importance of video content that I discussed in an earlier post.

For me, the most important takeaway from Shiri’s presentation was that video content can be used in a multitude of ways that will help enterprises achieve a broad range of marketing objectives. Video is great, of course, for building awareness, but as Shiri pointed out, video content is also a powerful tool for converting viewers into customers. The sensory richness of video content makes it both compelling and “shareable.” As Shiri said in her presentation, “Have you ever heard of a white paper that went viral?”

Shiri’s presentation includes many examples of companies that are using video content in innovative and effective ways. The featured company is Puma, but the presentation also includes examples from Red Bull, Oracle, Boeing, and many others.

If you’re interested in learning more about how to leverage video content in your marketing mix, this webinar will be well worth your time.

Access the recorded webinar here

Disruptive Technologies and the Practice of Marketing

In May, the McKinsey Global Institute published a fascinating report titled Disruptive technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global economy. The objective of this research was to identify technologies that have the potential to make a major impact on how people live and work, and on industries and economies over the next two decades or so.

The McKinsey report discusses 12 disruptive, game-changing technologies. The researchers estimate that, collectively, these technologies will produce a global economic impact of between $14 trillion and $33 trillion per year in 2025.

Two of the technologies described in the McKinsey report – the mobile Internet and the “Internet of Things” – are particularly relevant for enterprise marketers.

Read More…

The Emergence of On-Demand Marketing

McKinsey Quarterly recently published an article by Peter Dahlström and David Edelman titled The coming era of ‘on-demand’ marketing. The basic thrust of the article is that marketing is headed toward being on-demand, which the authors define as “not just always ‘on,’ but also always relevant, responsive to the consumer’s desire for marketing that cuts through the noise with pinpoint delivery.”

Dahlström and Edelman contend that on-demand marketing is being fueled by “the continued, symbiotic evolution of technology and consumer expectations.” On the technology front, the authors cite four critical developments:

  • The growth of mobile connectivity
  • The powerful capabilities of HTML5, which enables the creation of more compelling online experiences
  • The appearance of the “Internet of Things” through the use of near-field communications and similar technologies
  • Advances in the handling of “big data”

The authors argue that customer demands are also rising in four areas, which they label Now, Can I, For me, and Simply.

  • Now—Consumers increasingly expect to be able to interact with brands (and with each other) anywhere at any time.
  • Can I—They want to do more new and useful things as more kinds of information are deployed more effectively in ways that create more value.
  • For me—They increasingly expect that all data stored about them will be used to meet their precise needs and/or to personalize what they experience.
  • Simply—Consumers expect all interactions to be simple.

The McKinsey article paints an intriguing picture of the future of marketing, and I recommend that you take the time to read the entire article. For me, one striking aspect of what Dahlström and Edelman call on-demand marketing is the emphasis on responding effectively to the actions and behaviors of potential buyers. To get a good picture of what responding really means, take a look at the infographic in the McKinsey article about “Diane” and the purchase of an audio headset.

To achieve this level of responsiveness, enterprises will need three distinct technological capabilities. First, they must be able to leverage data to understand what potential customers expect and what kinds of interactions they will value. Second, enterprises must be able to reach potential customers with the right kinds of interactions using whatever interaction channel the potential customers prefer. And third, companies need the ability to refine their customer insights in an iterative fashion as more data becomes available and adapt the interactions they provide on a near real-time basis.

None of this will be easy, but many of the necessary technologies already exist, and the capabilities provided by these technologies are evolving rapidly. The greater challenge may be the need to adopt a new marketing mindset.

This article was published before on blog.adamsoftware.net

Is Your Marketing Ready for the Mobile Mind Shift?

According to Strategy Analytics , a global research and consulting firm, the number of smartphones in use worldwide reached 1.038 billion units during the third quarter of 2012. In a December 2012 presentation , Kleiner Perkins analyst Mary Meeker estimated that by the second quarter of 2013, the global installed base of smartphones and tablets will exceed the global installed base of desktop and laptop PC’s.

The explosive proliferation of mobile computing devices is fueling what Josh Bernoff, Forrester Researchsenior vice president of idea development, calls the mobile mind shift. Bernoff defines the mobile mind shift as: “A set of behaviors and mindsets in which people go forward with confidence that any desired information or service is available, on any appropriate device, in context, at their moment of need. 

According to Forrester Research, 22% of US consumers have made the mobile mind shift in varying degrees. The consumers who have made the shift are primarily young (in their 30’s) and have relatively high annual incomes. Bernoff contends that consumers who make the mobile mind shift demand mobile utility from the companies they work with and will punish companies that don’t provide it.

Read More…