Tag Archives: marketing

The Future of Marketing – Infographic

Optimal Targeting’s CEO David Konigsberg shares his insights on the future of marketing with this new metaphysically inclined infographic. It effectively explains how we have evolved in communication and continue to do so. The infographic further demonstrates how people remember and comprehend information better with a fusion of images, and text, and how it has become a great tool in the future of marketing.

Using Video to Amplify Your Content Marketing

Last month, ADAM hosted a webinar that explored how enterprises can use video content to amplify the impact of their content marketing. The webinar was presented by Shiri Friedman, Director of Marketing at Brightcove. Brightcove provides one of the leading platforms for hosting and publishing online video content, and ADAM’s new video management studio ( ADAM Videos ) is designed to work seamlessly with the Brightcove platform.

This was one of our most popular webinars, and you can view a recording of the webinar here.

During the webinar, Shiri Friedman shared several statistics that demonstrate the growing importance of video in the enterprise marketing mix.

  • Web pages with videos attract 2x to 3x more visitors than pages without videos, and they generate a 157% increase in organic traffic from search engines.
  • Website visitors who view a video are 85% more likely to buy than those who do not.
  • 76% of marketers plan to add videos to their websites (which makes video additions a higher priority than Facebook, Twitter, or blog integration).
  • Overall online video consumption is growing at 30%, but video consumption on tablets is growing at 360%, and video consumption on smartphones is growing at 300%.

These statistics are impressive, and they echo other data regarding the importance of video content that I discussed in an earlier post.

For me, the most important takeaway from Shiri’s presentation was that video content can be used in a multitude of ways that will help enterprises achieve a broad range of marketing objectives. Video is great, of course, for building awareness, but as Shiri pointed out, video content is also a powerful tool for converting viewers into customers. The sensory richness of video content makes it both compelling and “shareable.” As Shiri said in her presentation, “Have you ever heard of a white paper that went viral?”

Shiri’s presentation includes many examples of companies that are using video content in innovative and effective ways. The featured company is Puma, but the presentation also includes examples from Red Bull, Oracle, Boeing, and many others.

If you’re interested in learning more about how to leverage video content in your marketing mix, this webinar will be well worth your time.

Access the recorded webinar here

Evolution of a superhero

As a marketer, it is one of our tasks to safeguard brand identity. Do we use our logos in the same way, do we use the right logo, things we find important. Our brand must remain recognizable, right?
But don’t we stress too much about it? A good logo is still recognizable, even if it changes over time. Batman can teach us a lot about this, look once more to this poster. Funny how it’s logo changes allmost every year and we still recognize it, isn’t it?

NZ Marketing Summit – Mildie Meyer-Els | Barfoot and Thompson

Perpetua Productions and Pravda Communications hear views from Mildie at Barfoots on marketing at the recently held NZ Marketing Summit.

 

The Emergence of On-Demand Marketing

McKinsey Quarterly recently published an article by Peter Dahlström and David Edelman titled The coming era of ‘on-demand’ marketing. The basic thrust of the article is that marketing is headed toward being on-demand, which the authors define as “not just always ‘on,’ but also always relevant, responsive to the consumer’s desire for marketing that cuts through the noise with pinpoint delivery.”

Dahlström and Edelman contend that on-demand marketing is being fueled by “the continued, symbiotic evolution of technology and consumer expectations.” On the technology front, the authors cite four critical developments:

  • The growth of mobile connectivity
  • The powerful capabilities of HTML5, which enables the creation of more compelling online experiences
  • The appearance of the “Internet of Things” through the use of near-field communications and similar technologies
  • Advances in the handling of “big data”

The authors argue that customer demands are also rising in four areas, which they label Now, Can I, For me, and Simply.

  • Now—Consumers increasingly expect to be able to interact with brands (and with each other) anywhere at any time.
  • Can I—They want to do more new and useful things as more kinds of information are deployed more effectively in ways that create more value.
  • For me—They increasingly expect that all data stored about them will be used to meet their precise needs and/or to personalize what they experience.
  • Simply—Consumers expect all interactions to be simple.

The McKinsey article paints an intriguing picture of the future of marketing, and I recommend that you take the time to read the entire article. For me, one striking aspect of what Dahlström and Edelman call on-demand marketing is the emphasis on responding effectively to the actions and behaviors of potential buyers. To get a good picture of what responding really means, take a look at the infographic in the McKinsey article about “Diane” and the purchase of an audio headset.

To achieve this level of responsiveness, enterprises will need three distinct technological capabilities. First, they must be able to leverage data to understand what potential customers expect and what kinds of interactions they will value. Second, enterprises must be able to reach potential customers with the right kinds of interactions using whatever interaction channel the potential customers prefer. And third, companies need the ability to refine their customer insights in an iterative fashion as more data becomes available and adapt the interactions they provide on a near real-time basis.

None of this will be easy, but many of the necessary technologies already exist, and the capabilities provided by these technologies are evolving rapidly. The greater challenge may be the need to adopt a new marketing mindset.

This article was published before on blog.adamsoftware.net

State of Marketing #9: The future of Marketing

The Future of Marketing scares many companies and brands, and with good reason. Media trends shifted so quickly over the past decade that business are still playing catch up. Now with social adoption still continuing, mobile taking over the web, and new technologies like Google Glass and big data upon us, marketers face more change.

 

Is Your Marketing Ready for the Mobile Mind Shift?

According to Strategy Analytics , a global research and consulting firm, the number of smartphones in use worldwide reached 1.038 billion units during the third quarter of 2012. In a December 2012 presentation , Kleiner Perkins analyst Mary Meeker estimated that by the second quarter of 2013, the global installed base of smartphones and tablets will exceed the global installed base of desktop and laptop PC’s.

The explosive proliferation of mobile computing devices is fueling what Josh Bernoff, Forrester Researchsenior vice president of idea development, calls the mobile mind shift. Bernoff defines the mobile mind shift as: “A set of behaviors and mindsets in which people go forward with confidence that any desired information or service is available, on any appropriate device, in context, at their moment of need. 

According to Forrester Research, 22% of US consumers have made the mobile mind shift in varying degrees. The consumers who have made the shift are primarily young (in their 30’s) and have relatively high annual incomes. Bernoff contends that consumers who make the mobile mind shift demand mobile utility from the companies they work with and will punish companies that don’t provide it.

Read More…

State of Marketing #8: Should We Care About Big Data?

Big data discussions focus on the enormous amount of information available to businesses thanks to the social web. While adoption is low, the opportunity for companies and nonprofits to serve customers with specific offerings is irresistible. However, doubt remains as to its long-term impact for businesses.

Customers may test you, EMM helps you rise to the challenge

Enterprise Marketing Management, or EMM, is a software technology solution for marketing organizations that provides a comprehensive marketing platform for managing customer and prospect interactions throughout the customer lifecycle.

The practice of marketing is challenging these days because of the rise of the “empowered customer.” Today’s customers are well-informed, use other people as their primary information source, interact with companies through multiple channels, touch points and media, and want (but rarely get) a superior customer experience—and have outlets for venting frustration when they don’t get what they want.

Your customers are truly empowered. To serve these empowered customers, marketers must—now more than ever—put customers at the center of everything they do. In the whitepaper ‘Today’s empowered customer puts businesses to the test—Enterprise Marketing Management empowers marketers’ IBM tells you how to do so.

The results of IBM’s groundbreaking Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) study, released in 2011, reinforce the observation that marketing is a challenging practice these days. IBM interviewed over 1,700 CMOs from around the world to create this study. The data reveals some of the most important challenges facing CMO’s and their marketing organizations today.

The top four challenges are data explosion, social media, growth of channel and device choices, and shifting consumer demographics. It’s easy to see why CMO’s are facing a “complexity gap,” because all of these challenges make marketing much more complicated today that it has ever been before. And it’s only going to get more complicated in the future.

Read More…

A New Approach to the Marketing Budgeting Process

Ahhh Fall…For many of us it signals welcome relief from the summer heat.  Also, for many of us it signals budgeting season and that too many marketers will be submitting their budgets before even creating their marketing plan.  Yes, that does seem a bit backwards!  How can you know what to budget if you don’t yet know what you plan to do?  So what do we do? One common approach is to build the budget based on how the current budget is allocated across headcount, travel and various marketing activities, such as PR, Digital, Events, Training, and so on, make a few adjustments and hit the submit button.

While this may seem like a feasible method, it’s a dangerous one. The budget may be allocated against activities we intend to produce, but it’s unclear what impact or value these activities, and the associated funds, are going to have on the business in terms of new customers, retained customers, additional vertical or customer expansion, or contribution to the business from new products.  It’s no wonder our budget is suspect and immediately comes under fire, especially from the folks in Finance.  And this approach sets the stage for questions like these:

  • Why ads in these pubs?
  • Why so many webinars or trade shows?
  • Why so much money for the email automation platform?
  • Why so much money for new content?

Right away we’re playing defense – with others e.g. finance, suggesting ways we can reduce our spending.  And before we’ve even gotten out of the gate our budget is eroding.  If this isn’t your world, congratulations! If it is, here’s the shocker.  It’s your fault.

If those of us who end up in these conversations had taken a different approach, the conversation would have gone differently.  As marketers we need to think beyond the subaccounts in the cost accounting system.  We need to understand how the dollars we’re requesting are actually going to move business needles.  Businesses are based on revenue and profits generated by customers buying our products/ services, hopefully profitably.  This is the very essence of Marketing.  As a result, we need to think about our budgets in terms of the customers and what they buy.  So rather than submitting a budget for activities, what if you submitted a budget that allocated funds into buckets such as these:

  1. Marketing generated business from net new customers buying existing products
  2. Marketing generated business from existing customers buying existing products
  3. Marketing generated business from net new customers buying new products
  4. Marketing generated business from existing customers buying new products

Of course this would mean we would need to know how many existing customers the company currently serves, where, what products they buy, and how many potential customers there are for these products and where are these potential customers.  And we’d need to know what new products are going to market, the competitive situation, and what customers are most likely to buy these products.  And we’d have to have some targets for each of these categories.  Imagine though that we knew this information about our customers, products, and market.

If we were to budget in this fashion, it doesn’t mean our friends in finance wouldn’t be making a visit, but the conversation will certainly be different.  They will still want to know why we need so much money but instead of defending an activity that we don’t even know we will want to deploy since we haven’t created the plan, we’ll be having a discussion about the business – how many customers, which ones, how easy or hard it will be acquire, retain or grow these customers, our competitive situation, and our product innovation situation.  I’d rather have these conversations with the CFO or other members of the leadership team any day than a conversation about which tradeshows to attend.  And once we have clarity around marketing’s contribution via customer acquisition, retention and growth,  we will also have achieved better alignment with the business and gained insight into how to measure and account for our value.  Plus we will have created maneuvering room and the ability to select the activities best suited to achieve the result.