Archive | October, 2013

The Content Avalanche

“There’s no denying it, ‘The Content Avalanche’ has hit”, says B2B Marketing while introducing their annual event B2B Marketing annual Conference. Everywhere we look content is coming at us. E-mail, twitter, Facebook and full event calendars. Because of the sheer volume of it it’s no suprise marketers are left overwhelmed when trying to create compelling and effective content.

B2B Marketing therefore has invited several ‘brains’ from the business to get some exclusive insight ahead of the event. A few names are Dave Stevens, Marketing Director, UK&I at EY; Drew Nicholson, CEO, DNX; Dave Chaffey, CEO, Smart Insights; Caspian Woods, Chief Content Strategist, Editions Financial and Laila Lotfi, Head of Product Marketing, Redgate Software amongst others. They will shed their light on the matter of the Content Avalanche.

B2B Marketing’s Annual Conference  will take place on 7 November 2013 at 11 Cavendish Square, London. Booking can be done here

 

The Emergence of On-Demand Marketing

McKinsey Quarterly recently published an article by Peter Dahlström and David Edelman titled The coming era of ‘on-demand’ marketing. The basic thrust of the article is that marketing is headed toward being on-demand, which the authors define as “not just always ‘on,’ but also always relevant, responsive to the consumer’s desire for marketing that cuts through the noise with pinpoint delivery.”

Dahlström and Edelman contend that on-demand marketing is being fueled by “the continued, symbiotic evolution of technology and consumer expectations.” On the technology front, the authors cite four critical developments:

  • The growth of mobile connectivity
  • The powerful capabilities of HTML5, which enables the creation of more compelling online experiences
  • The appearance of the “Internet of Things” through the use of near-field communications and similar technologies
  • Advances in the handling of “big data”

The authors argue that customer demands are also rising in four areas, which they label Now, Can I, For me, and Simply.

  • Now—Consumers increasingly expect to be able to interact with brands (and with each other) anywhere at any time.
  • Can I—They want to do more new and useful things as more kinds of information are deployed more effectively in ways that create more value.
  • For me—They increasingly expect that all data stored about them will be used to meet their precise needs and/or to personalize what they experience.
  • Simply—Consumers expect all interactions to be simple.

The McKinsey article paints an intriguing picture of the future of marketing, and I recommend that you take the time to read the entire article. For me, one striking aspect of what Dahlström and Edelman call on-demand marketing is the emphasis on responding effectively to the actions and behaviors of potential buyers. To get a good picture of what responding really means, take a look at the infographic in the McKinsey article about “Diane” and the purchase of an audio headset.

To achieve this level of responsiveness, enterprises will need three distinct technological capabilities. First, they must be able to leverage data to understand what potential customers expect and what kinds of interactions they will value. Second, enterprises must be able to reach potential customers with the right kinds of interactions using whatever interaction channel the potential customers prefer. And third, companies need the ability to refine their customer insights in an iterative fashion as more data becomes available and adapt the interactions they provide on a near real-time basis.

None of this will be easy, but many of the necessary technologies already exist, and the capabilities provided by these technologies are evolving rapidly. The greater challenge may be the need to adopt a new marketing mindset.

This article was published before on blog.adamsoftware.net

State of Marketing #9: The future of Marketing

The Future of Marketing scares many companies and brands, and with good reason. Media trends shifted so quickly over the past decade that business are still playing catch up. Now with social adoption still continuing, mobile taking over the web, and new technologies like Google Glass and big data upon us, marketers face more change.

 

CMOs Will Outspend CIOs on Technology by 2017

How do today’s marketers truly view their ability to harness and leverage big data to produce measurable results?

That’s the question posed by the team at Teradata. And the answer may be found by diving into the extensive new Teradata Data-Driven Marketing Survey 2013.

The global results offer an in-depth look at some key issues, including marketers’ perceptions of how their companies use data to guide marketing decisions, perceived barriers to using data to drive marketing, and where marketers’ expect their organizations to place data-driven priorities over the next couple of years.

Is Your Marketing Ready for the Mobile Mind Shift?

According to Strategy Analytics , a global research and consulting firm, the number of smartphones in use worldwide reached 1.038 billion units during the third quarter of 2012. In a December 2012 presentation , Kleiner Perkins analyst Mary Meeker estimated that by the second quarter of 2013, the global installed base of smartphones and tablets will exceed the global installed base of desktop and laptop PC’s.

The explosive proliferation of mobile computing devices is fueling what Josh Bernoff, Forrester Researchsenior vice president of idea development, calls the mobile mind shift. Bernoff defines the mobile mind shift as: “A set of behaviors and mindsets in which people go forward with confidence that any desired information or service is available, on any appropriate device, in context, at their moment of need. 

According to Forrester Research, 22% of US consumers have made the mobile mind shift in varying degrees. The consumers who have made the shift are primarily young (in their 30’s) and have relatively high annual incomes. Bernoff contends that consumers who make the mobile mind shift demand mobile utility from the companies they work with and will punish companies that don’t provide it.

Read More…